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Infrastructure – A Solo Exhibition by Jenny Odell

When: February 5 – March 29, 2014

Opening Reception: Wednesday February 5, 6-9pm

Artist's Talk: Saturday, March 22, 2pm, Free

Gallery Hours: Tuesdays – Saturdays, 12–6pm, FREE

Location: Intersection for the Arts Gallery 925 Mission Street SF CA 94103

MEDIA COVERAGE

Juxtapoz (January 30, 2014)
ArtBusiness (Feburary 1, 2014)
Droste Effect (February 12, 2014)
SF Weekly (February 26, 2014)
ArtNerd San Francisco (March 2, 2014)
Wired (March 4, 2014)
The Economist (March 10, 2014)
Vice The Creators Project (March 11, 2014)
Beautiful/Decay (March 17, 2014)
Architizer (March 18, 2014)

Intersection for the Arts presents Infrastructure, a solo exhibition featuring new work by Jenny Odell. In her digital works on paper, Odell creates intricate compositions that forge a language speaking to a generation of the world that remains forever digitized and documented. Her work examines the structure and networks of human existence and behavior, each piece brimming with data about the way we build and move and live and grow. Odell utilizes Google Maps to gather information and imagery to create her work. The satellite view of earth provided by this technology is unique in that it allows us to see our environment from an absolutely unconventional, inhuman perspective. This view from above creates a categorical shift in angle and scale, inviting us to reconsider our surroundings with an alternative frame of reference – a perspective that allows us to better understand how human society has organized itself through the construction of buildings, roadways, electrical powerlines, trash landfills, and shipping ports. Seen from above, the surface of the earth is pockmarked with these physical marks of human existence.  As Odell says in one of her artist statements, “like hieroglyphs that say: people were here.” For this exhibition, Odell creates new work exploring the physical infrastructure of utility systems that make modern life possible – electrical power plants, wastewater treatment plants, solar panel fields – infrastructure generally hidden from daily view and placed in the peripheries of towns and cities.

“Much of the strangest architecture associated with humanity is infrastructural. We have vast arrays of rusting cylinders, oil rigs dotting wastelands like lonely insects, and jewel-toned, rhomboid ponds of chemical waste. We have gray and terraced landfills, 5-story tall wastewater digester eggs, and striped areas of the desert that look as though they rendered incorrectly until we realize that the lines are made of thousands of solar panels. Massive cooling towers of power plants slope away from dense, unidentifiable networks on the ground and are obscured in their own ominous fog. If there is something unsettling about these structures, it might be that they are deeply, fully human at the same time that they are unrecognizably technological. These mammoth devices unblinkingly process our waste, accept our trash, distribute our electricity. They are our prostheses. They keep us alive and able, for a minute, to forget the precariousness of our existence here and of our total biological dependence on a series of machines, wires, and tubes, humming loudly in some far off place.

But at the same time that they sustain us – making possible one more day on this planet – they also tell the story of inevitability, spelled out in so many oddly shaped structures. In everyday life, distance matters: landfills are typically located behind hills, the pipes run underground, the coal plant is far away, the wastewater flows to a different city. Trash is transferred and transferred again. These hidden places comprise the specific physical site of what at all other times (save perhaps for the people working in these places) remains an abstract sense of finitude. But this physicality is stubborn; they can only be moved so far away. These are places where, in other words, the shit finally hits the fan.

Even as testaments to the best in engineering, the structures take on a tragic air. They are already monuments; that is, they are monuments of a time (now) when the world careened toward total environmental irresponsibility, when more and more was borrowed against a disappearing future and we all knew it. Inside the plants, everything has been maximized and streamlined, but the plants themselves form the constellation of something whose logic is closer to that of a tired man who’s lost all his money in a windowless casino and now slumps forward to play some more. This is the tragic air: that they look already like dinosaurs, like relics of a failed time from the perspective of a time when we will know better — or when we are no longer here.” – Jenny Odell

JENNY ODELL is a Bay Area native/captive with an MFA in Design from the San Francisco Art Institute and a BA in English Literature from UC Berkeley. Her work has been featured at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, Google Headquarters, and Les Rencontres D’Arles in France. It’s also turned up in TIME Magazine, the Atlantic, the NPR Picture Show, Pop-up Magazine, Rhizome, Guernica, and ESPN Magazine. Abroad, her work has been featured in Die Zeit, European Photography, NEON Magazine, Le Soir, Elephant Magazine, and most bizarrely, a Belgian TV guide that came in the mail with an assortment of gorilla stickers. She has given talks at San Francisco State, San Francisco Art Institute, California College of the Arts, Stanford University, IDEO, and Queen’s Nails Projects. She is a recipient of a San Francisco Arts Commission individual artist grant, and is currently a lecturer at Stanford University.  She is based in San Francisco, CA.

Image above: Jenny Odell, Manufacturing Landscape (detail), 2013.

 

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Throughout Spring 2014, Intersection’s multi-disciplinary program explores various mechanisms of social order at work. The artists in Systems offer economic, historical, political, and aesthetic regimes as subjects for discussion. The series boasts a wide array of new work that draw our attention to systems — systems of economy, systems of tradition, and systems of oppression, among others — that may be so self-evident that we are no longer aware of them. Is it possible to uncover these systems? Is it possible to open them up to fertile explorations, critical reflections, and hopefully, to creative alternatives? Find out more about Systems HERE.

 

 

 

  • Fidel Micó March 10, 2014 at 7:18 pm

    Odell’s idea will be actually inspirational for my future work, because I have been planning more conceptual representations of landscapes. In the past, I made some efforts in this direction, but I felt that something was empty, and her works have suggested me new ideas. Her piece “Manufacturing Landscape” is particularly evocative of a wide diversity of messages on the interaction between humans and nature that I will always keep in mind as a serious reference system and starting point for innovative compositions and combinations of genres in a single painting.

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Intersection for the Arts is a leading-edge arts and community development organization that connects people and communities across physical, social, cultural, and economic boundaries to instigate change.